6 Responses

  1. Laurie
    Laurie at · · Reply

    There is an orchard in Alabama that is on the road between here and my mom and dad’s house that sells a type of apple that I don’t know what it is but it is wonderful. I have never seen them in the store, not even in the farmer’s market and I don’t know what it is called. I want some so bad right now, thanks! 😉

    1. Laurie
      Laurie at · · Reply

      I think it might be Dixie Red Delight Apples now that I have rummaged around on google.
      http://www.kuffelcreek.com/images/Dixie%20Red%20Delight.jpg
      Dixie Red Delight Alabama, 1960’s A sport of Red Delight of the early 1900’s, Dixie Red Delight was developed by an amateur horticulturist, Oren T. Bolding, of Sylacauga, Alabama. Fruit is medium to large, with red skin and yellow ground color. Flavor is sharp, sweet, aromatic, and spicy, and improves in storage; the closest thing to Virginia Winesap we’ve tasted in a hot climate. Keeps well and improves in storage, bears heavily and reliably, ripens late in the season and blooms late.

      1. amieravenson
        amieravenson at · · Reply

        Hmmm.. I’ll keep an eye out. The only place I know around here that has any kind of decent apple selection is the Buford Highway Farmer’s Market. We bought one each of like 14 varieties there last year, intending to do a review. It didn’t happen. Obviously. :0)

  2. Laurie
    Laurie at · · Reply

    There is an orchard in Alabama that is on the road between here and my mom and dad’s house that sells a type of apple that I don’t know what it is but it is wonderful. I have never seen them in the store, not even in the farmer’s market and I don’t know what it is called. I want some so bad right now, thanks! 😉

    1. Laurie
      Laurie at · · Reply

      I think it might be Dixie Red Delight Apples now that I have rummaged around on google.
      http://www.kuffelcreek.com/images/Dixie%20Red%20Delight.jpg
      Dixie Red Delight Alabama, 1960’s A sport of Red Delight of the early 1900’s, Dixie Red Delight was developed by an amateur horticulturist, Oren T. Bolding, of Sylacauga, Alabama. Fruit is medium to large, with red skin and yellow ground color. Flavor is sharp, sweet, aromatic, and spicy, and improves in storage; the closest thing to Virginia Winesap we’ve tasted in a hot climate. Keeps well and improves in storage, bears heavily and reliably, ripens late in the season and blooms late.

      1. amieravenson
        amieravenson at · · Reply

        Hmmm.. I’ll keep an eye out. The only place I know around here that has any kind of decent apple selection is the Buford Highway Farmer’s Market. We bought one each of like 14 varieties there last year, intending to do a review. It didn’t happen. Obviously. :0)

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